Who Signed the Nafta Trade Agreement

The North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, was signed by three countries: The United States of America, Canada, and Mexico. It was a historic trade agreement that was signed on January 1, 1994, and it created a trilateral trade bloc in North America.

NAFTA was the first free trade agreement between two developed countries and a developing country. The agreement aimed to increase trade and investment among the three countries by reducing tariffs, eliminating barriers to trade, and establishing a fair and transparent framework for trade.

The agreement was signed by President Bill Clinton for the United States, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney for Canada, and President Carlos Salinas de Gortari for Mexico. These leaders recognized the benefits of increased trade among the three countries and worked together to negotiate the agreement.

NAFTA was a controversial agreement that sparked debates about the impacts of free trade on jobs, wages, and the environment. Supporters of the agreement argued that it would create jobs and increase economic growth, while opponents argued that it would result in the loss of jobs and lower wages.

Despite the controversy, NAFTA remained in effect for over two decades, until it was replaced by the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) on July 1, 2020. The USMCA builds on the successes of NAFTA and includes new provisions that update and modernize the agreement for the 21st century.

In conclusion, the North American Free Trade Agreement was signed by President Bill Clinton for the United States, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney for Canada, and President Carlos Salinas de Gortari for Mexico. The agreement aimed to increase trade and investment among the three countries and was a historic agreement that remained in effect for over two decades.